Tag Archives: printmaking

Uncertain Narratives (2003)

Uncertain Narratives is the name of this exhibition and the title of the earliest work. It serves to sum up the concerns in my work. What ties the paintings, the collaged prints and the film together is an intuitive process of working. I think of the individual processes like the pages in a book that go to make up the whole. My background is in painting, print and film-making. The development of the new technologies, mainly the computer, has allowed me not only to continue my fascination with film which had become impossible, but also to develop other aspects of my work in more expansive ways. This is because the technologies allow the possibility of bringing together all of the processes of printing, painting and the moving image. The computer allows both random access to a large amount of information and provides infinite variations as well as aiding the layering process. I use the computer to produce two kinds of work, the first are still images, the second, moving images usually in video form.

The work shown here, The Tunnel, consists of a video (5:33) constructed from still images and video fragments and a 5 meter long print work made up of 15 prints. The film becomes a series of moving collages and paintings in time. The Tunnel video began as a response to an invitation from five media artists in Germany to participate in a project called “Gegenort – the Virtual Mine”. This was a globally networked exhibition and multimedia project sited at the disused coal mine at Neunkirchen. The basic idea was that of the mine as a place of energy production. In former times, coal was the most important raw material of the industrial era. Now it could be said that the primary resources are information, knowledge and imagination. The project’s intention was to continue the original purpose of the mine as a place of energy production. Their tool is the internet, which they use to invite artists from all over the world to participate. The idea was to look for today’s “raw material” by creating a virtual borehole lengthening the disused shaft to the centre of the earth. “Gegenort” can be literally translated into English as “opposing place”. The Tunnel as it was shown in Germany proposed a connection between Gegenort – the Virtual Mine – and Robertson. This exhibition further extends the virtual bore to Armidale. This work reflects on different stream of energy flow, that of people, the effect of transmigration, and the raw material of memories and experiences.

The effect of place and displacement is a major concern in my work. My own background and cultural memory are informed by my parents’ pre-way migration from Italy and Austria to Australia. The images come from a journey, a series of intersecting moments in which public events traverse and shape private moments. Layered and seemingly incongruous images produce a time-based collage, which has no fixed point of entry or exit. Finally, remembered fragments function to reflect the past and search for rest in an uncertain present.

The still works, the collages (Uncertain Narratives) are the most recent works in the exhibition. I think of them as stretched out moments, some abstract, some figurative. In the end they all belong to a kind of stream of consciousness that moves in and out of both private and public narratives. I begin with images from diverse sources such as cinema and Graeco-Roman sculpture, and using various processes of ringing to layer the images, I finally paint and engrave the surfaces of the work. This both distils essential qualities of the images and also pushes towards to the abstract. I see these as the results of a kind of archaeology, a sort of digging or mining into my own history. I’d like to finish with a few words about the paintings (Interruptions and Cancellations). I think they are important because they represent the moment of complete distillation into abstraction, that transitory moment when all words and images fade before it all begins again.

Peter Delorenzo, Neram, 19 December 2002

The Tunnel (2001)

The Tunnel was produced as a digital film and a digital print; the two pieces were variously shown at New England Regional gallery, the Wollongong City Galley, and at Gegenort and in the Virtual Mine internet project in Germany.

 

The Tunnel (print)

The Tunnel Print panels 1 – 10

panels 11 – 15, digital print on archival paper, 540 X 5m

This print was developed in 2002 as  a direct extension of the exhibition at Gegenort. The print work is five metres long and is a sequence of fifteen images, each measuring 50cm by 30cm. The prints resemble etchings in their tonal and surface qualities but have been produced on an ink jet proofing printer on Stonehenge paper.

This work reflects on a different stream of energy flow, that of people, the effect of transmigration, and the raw material of memories and experiences. The effect of place and displacement is a major concern in the work. My own background and cultural memory are informed by the pre-war migration from Germany/Italy and Austria; Yugoslavia of my parents to Australia. The images come from a journey , a series of intersecting moments in which public events traverse and shape private moments. Layered and seemingly incongruous images produce a time-based collage which has no fixed point of entry or exit. Finally remembered fragments function to reflect the past and search for rest in an uncertain present.

 

The Tunnel (video)

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The First Three Digital Films

reflection, abstraction and memory structures … RAMs

RAMs

“The work seeks to establish visual similes between ordinary images and cultural icons by exploring the way informal body language specific to time and place becomes public language encapsulated in cultural icons. RAMs is a time-based work that brings together elements of paintng, video and photography. Each frame has been layered and blended to produce a seamless work which seeks to be painterly and evocative. It employs images derived from sources as diverse as the electronic media, popular culture as expressed through films of the forties and fifties, and personal video snapshots. The acronym RAM in computer jargon stands for random-access memory.”

Produced with the assistance of the Australian Film Commission

1994, 13 min

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red dress

red dress frame

“The instant begins in a railway station and ends in a place in the mind when time and space engage one another in an ambiguous dance, each courting the other’s memories. The layered weaving of incongruous images produces a 4-dimensional collage in which metaphor and reality regularly change places and in so doing defy a fixed point of departure or exit, thus the journey is forever inconclusive.”

1996, 2min30

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like ice, like fire

kodak dye sublimation print, 8 X 10 inch

dye sublimation print, 8 X 10 in

 

“In nature we never see anything isolated but everything in connection with something else which is before it, beside it, under it and over it.”
Goethe
“Nothing exists in isolation. In the work like ice like fire meaning occupies a constantly shifting ground. Each image exists in a complex web, echoed in a parallel sequence of synthesised sound. Throughout the work the horse and its rider herald a series of uncertain narratives each one leaving behind its own haunting possibilities.”

1997, 3min30

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Paper Concertina (1993)

An exhibition review.

Sitting surrounded by his current exhibition Paper Concertina. Peter De Lorenzo dispassionately interrupted our conversation aoout the importance of a single Image which may have the ability t0 embody the sequence, with a query ‘isn’t that a pram rolling down the road?’ as he moved to the doorway t0 gain a clearer view.

It was and it had little legs wriggling in the air and no one attached t0 the handle. As his body tilted to run after it a female turned, saw the momentumous offspring and launched herself successfully after the velocipede. It summed up the exhibition for me. An encapsulation thrust forward in one quick blur.

My glimpse of the powder blue bootied baby’s legs raised skyward moving at speed. Peter’s expression change, The mother’s expression change. The instant of change in her body as her spinal chord reacted to adrenalin. My own slowly comprehending response of Yes and it’s got a kid in it. The scenario. had anyone of those miliinstances been documented may not have necessarily revealed the precise and detailed sequence but. would have resonated a whole range of dire consequences of gelatinous delay. The instant of understanding is what it means .

The instant of irretrievable. irrevocable action, the very instant when change occurs.

I suspect a high velocity pram may lodge itself in one of Peter’s stills counterpoised with one or two other participants. flicking. alternating on one of his rice paper concertinas just as Baptiste and Garance do in their silent movie blue world. These razed remnants Of films and sculptures and postcards are the ah ha result 0f the fast forward. rewind. fast forward, pause, the opportune glimpse registering fifty pages later in an art book, the twentieth removed mediated form. video grabbed. photocopied. printed and welded. Distant past, winged victory, Paris, les Enfants. Ensnarement, the moment 0f seduction. the idea of it, the horror of it all trapped in static blue. Maroon murky slightly evading clear focus, frames of a moving picture.

The gesture of grand Greece, of morbid Greek tragedy hidden and resurrected. This exhibition is about archives found and documented on materials that are ephemeral, photocopying on rice paper, texta colour on acetate. Perverse. Dig up what is so sought after, the quintessential gesture, trap it then watch its degenerated visual form degenerate in material form. Dust to dust.

Grand themes politely and cunningly disguised for unwitting and conditioned eyes.

Sally Montague.

Co direclo’ Bumie Slreet Gallery

IMPRINT Spring 1993 p15